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Research Areas

Research areas in computer engineering and electrical engineering at University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio

Research Areas

Advanced Health Technologies

This research area focuses on generating advances in technologies that form necessary building blocks that are required for future medical devices.  The confluence of on biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS), bioelectronics and biosensors is accelerating development of advanced technologies for healthcare, from benchtop systems to portable point-of-care systems.  This research area is the central focus for three research centers housed in EECS:

Additionally, these centers work in collaboration with a number of individual research labs in a collaborative environment that focuses on innovating the next generation of medical technologies. With expertise ranging from biomaterials, to microfluidics and BioMEMS devices, to medical system development, the collection of researchers working in this area is well positioned to transform new technology invention into medical products that provide medical intervention and improve medical outcomes for future patients.

Affiliated Faculty: 

Chong Ahn, Fred Beyette, Leyla Esfandiari, Jason Heikenfeld, Rashmi Jha, Ian Papautsky, Andrew Steckl

Embedded, Flexible, and Wearable Systems

This research area focuses on wearable systems that integrate flexible electronics with nanobiosensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies for a wide range of application, from energy harvesting and storage to environmental exposure sensing.  These integrated and connected systems marry sensors and actuators info wearable items (e.g., band aids, shirts, footwear) and can monitor body location, motion, body vital signs and medical status, and local environment. 

Affiliated Faculty: 

Je-Hyeong Bahk, Fred Beyette, Yue Cui, Leyla Esfandiari, Jason Heikenfeld, Rashmi Jha

Nanoelectronics and Materials

This research area focuses on nanoelectronic devices and soft materials for a variety of applications and fields: electronics, photonics, spintronics, fluid mechanics, and biomedical. The confluence of nanotechnology and molecular biology is transforming our understanding of biology and is accelerating its transition to many applications. Inspired by the blueprint of Nature-Inspired Nanotechnology, Biotronics will be a critical component of the overall trend for the development of green technologies. Indeed, other industrial sectors have already been pursuing green technology for some time with increasing technical success and market acceptance.

The energy sector has been at the forefront of developing and utilizing green technology by supporting multiple approaches for various applications. This includes the use of solar cells, wind turbines, fuel cells, biofuels, energy efficient building design, and more. Today the electronics industry is as pervasive as the energy industry. Biotronics has the potential to transform the semiconductor/electronics industry from one that routinely uses toxic, polluting, non-replaceable materials to one which uses renewable, environmentally friendly, widely available natural materials.

The use of naturally occurring biomaterials to serve as the basis of electronic devices is currently in its infancy, and given the expertise within EECS, UC has an opportunity to serve as an influential agent of change in this emerging field.

Affiliated Faculty: 

Chong Ahn, Fred Beyette, Punit Boolchand, Marc Cahay, Leyla Esfandiari, Jason Heikenfeld, Rashmi Jha, Andrew Steckl